Lessons learned at LibCamp 2016 and LILAC 2016

By Genevieve Larkin

 

My Pitch at LibCamp this year was two things. On the one hand it described a few of the highlights of LILAC 2016 (which I attended thanks to sponsorship from the ever-supportive Academic and Special Libraries Section of the LAI), and on the other it was an attempt to generate some discussion on how teaching librarians could support each-other in Ireland by forming a community of practice.

gen pitch 4

Challenges:

Mapping to standards

Challenges that I face (and I’m sure I’m not alone) include the formidable one of mapping any teaching I do to internationally recognised professional standards. Having studied information literacy standards and models during my M.Sc LIS I know what’s out there and which ones I like (ACRL’s framework for information literacy for higher education and ANZIL) but the more conceptual aspects of these models can make generating meaningful learning outcomes and content for classes time-consuming and tricky.

Lesson planning

This is where good lesson planning comes in – concepts familiar to educators such as learning outcomes, scaffolding, sequencing and assessment can all seem baffling but they are the tools of the trade and allow you to structure what you’re doing so that it makes sense for learners.

Support structures

For those of us working outside of traditional University support structures (which come with perks such as in-house teaching and learning support/training) it can seem doubly-daunting and we must find help where we can – from instructional designers and academics to the internet and each-other!

Other duties

Most librarians have other duties in addition to the teaching aspect of their roles – such as management of electronic resources and institutional repositories, website and social media maintenance, outreach, acquisitions, etc. (the list goes on!)

Solutions:

The solutions I’ve come up with so far are the following:

My Highlights of LILAC 2016:

Instructional Design and how to apply it to IL work

Instructional design is the process of analysing learning needs and goals and the development of a delivery system to meet those needs. I came across Kimberley Mullins IDEA model at LILAC which she has adapted to allow librarians to integrate information literacy into most courses. She provides templates for the stages: interviewing, designing, embedding and assessing. I hope to try this approach with my first embedded course. You can see her slides from LILAC here.gen pitch 2

Reflecting on my imposter syndrome

During Char Booth‘s inspiring keynote speech at LILAC she talked about the journey from librarian to teacher to administrator – planning and overseeing information literacy programmes. She eloquently described how pushing yourself outside your comfort zone can be a “heinous trauma.” This was by far my favourite part of the whole conference as I (and the rest of the audience!) identified strongly with her brave acknowledgement of the fear that many of us have at some time felt about learning to teach. Later on I found her blog-post on banishing your professional imposter here. Top tips from Char:

  1. “Cultivate experiences that rip you out of your comfort zone while still providing support
  2. Be mentored and seek mentees
  3. Challenge your perceived limitations
  4. Build a community of allies…”

I think all of these are highly applicable to teaching librarians. Find Char’s LILAC slides here.

Researching your practice

The importance of taking the time and effort to research and reflect upon your practice came up time and again at LILAC as the main differentiator between meaningful engagement with our colleagues and students and just rehashing mistakes while failing to capitalise on user needs and preferences. Some key trends in library research evidenced at the conference were:

Ethnographic research in libraries (or UX) involves taking an ethnographic approach to library service design –  in other words, thinking like a student instead of presuming to know what they want/need etc. It did occur to me that it might be very difficult to use this approach in a small or special library context.

Librarians doing doctorates: Why? Because this allows us to base our practice in evidence or at the very least to deepen our understanding of the research process. Why not? I’ve had this discussion with lots of librarians and the reasons are many: time/expense/the perils of over-qualification etc…doctorates are not for everyone!

Appreciative inquiry allows the researcher to embrace the positive, start from what the library is doing right, what you want to retain, what the ideal outcome of your activities would be, and how to reach as close to that as possible.

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Brainstorming on creating a community of practice for instructional librarians using appreciative inquiry Qs

“Communities of practice” were made famous by Wenger and are often the focus of educational research. For this brainstorm, we collected ideas on how to create a local community of practice for instructional librarians. There were many imaginative and exciting ideas, with Marie O’Neill from DBS Library suggesting DBS as a meeting place for a group of like-minded librarians who would like to come together to share their methods and resources. We also thought about a repository of open access materials such as lesson plans for librarians which could be hosted by eDeposit Ireland. Michelle Dalton (LibFocus/UCD Library) pointed out the opportunity for further TeachMeets in UCD Library after a successful one run a few years ago. I came away feeling there was great scope for building a COP and lots of potential ways to actively support each-other. See further ideas generated in the snapshot below:

Libcamp pitch flipchart

Flipchart from brainstorming activity on creating a community of practice for instructional librarians

Written by Genevieve Larkin

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LibCamp 2016: A Reflection

by Carolanne McPartlan

Presenting at Library Camp this year was a very different experience: last year I was in the middle of my wonderful six-week work experience placement, in the Cregan Library in St. Patrick’s College, DCU; this year I pitched from the perspective of a library advocate, with an outside perspective and opinion, on how librarians should use networking, and cross-discipline collaboration, to further their role as teachers. The afternoon was both interesting, and most definitely, rewarding.  I put forward my thoughts and observations below. Librarians, you do a very valuable job: ‘May the Force Be with You’… Always.

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The main points of my pitch were:

  • I passionately believe that in a true republic, where education should be available to all of the people, equally, libraries are both central, and essential.
  • However, I have been thinking that librarians should be involved wherever, and whenever, possible in the wider skills/ teaching/academic world: at local/grass-roots level, in addition to a national level.
  • People on the floor/at the coal-face are powerful, and need to feel engaged and empowered.
  • Having followed various #’s of library/information, academic/student, and Career/Guidance Counsellor’s workshops/conferences, it seems to me to me that there is room, and indeed a need, for a coordinated approach from all stakeholders.
  • My pitch mentioned such things as the ‘T-shaped’ graduate and ePortfolios as an example of how, and why, librarians need to network, and join the conversation in associated arenas, with associated stakeholders, in order to demonstrate viability and secure their future.
  • Librarian Get LoudGet Involved…if you are involved Get More Involved!
  • If you get a chance to look through the feed from the #eportfoliohub16, and you’ll perhaps be struck, as I was, regarding the similarity of ideas, concerns, and motivations with some of those at #lilac16.
  • Librarians need not only to get LOUD, but, in these days of adaptability/innovation, should be leaders in reaching out to other interested parties regarding these issues.
  • Ok, let’s think big here…Imagine what could be achieved through a coordinated workshop, moving to a full-on conference and road-map/agreed or imagined approach?
  • Library/information professionals are under pressure to make their positions relevant, imagine if librarians could become involved in something like the research/composition of Eportfolios for example?
  • Using all your research/teaching expertise, giving you access to another department within an organisation, opening the door to administrative, training, HR and academic departments, and the students/colleagues therein?
  • Also, it would further diversify your role…. Having worked in a commercial environment myself, I really believe that to innovate, and diversify is crucial to survival, and a means to show the value of the service been given. Synergy is a given in business.
  • Are the LAI or associated institutions represented/present at conferences such as Career Guidance, NALA, various Professions or Teacher’s conferences?
  • Do these important and influential bodies know how progressive librarians are?
  • Have any of their reps been invited to CDG initiatives, Librarians ALOUD, LILAC 2016? Not necessarily to present, just to attend….
  • Do they know what you are doing, what you can offer, what wonderful allies you can be?
  • It seems to me that if you join forces on matters such as IL/ePortfolios for example, you may forge other areas where literacy, career, research and academic initiatives can be work-shopped, and a uniform approach, with librarians very much involved, could be agreed upon, and acted upon, keeping libraries/librarians at the core of whatever is happening in education/training

Carolanne

#eportfoliohub16

‘An e-portfolio is a purposeful aggregating of digital items – ideas, evidence, reflections, feedback etc., which ‘presents’ a selected audience with evidence of a person’s learning and/or ability.‘(Sutherland and Powell, 2007).

  • Paper-based portfolios have been used in education for many years.
  • In recent times the electronic portfolio or eportfolio has emerged as a preferred option, allowing portfolio owners to take advantage of digital technologies, often supported by specific eportfolio software.
    [Incidentally, for any of you not involved in academic libraries, could this service be used in career/training initiatives within your organisation?]
  • This three day workshop event, which takes place in DIT Aungier Street, will explore themes such as ePortfolio projects, tools and platforms, assessment and reflection, and digital identity and career progression.
  • DIT, ITB, ITT and Hibernia College, along with the support of the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, are delighted to host a National Irish ePortfolio Workshop event ‘ePortfolios in Ireland: What Now, Where Next?’ on 21st – 23rd March, 2016.
  • Some of the presenters came from DIT, IADT, RCSI, Teaching Institutes of education, LIT, TCD…
  • LILAC16same dates! – Was there a library/information specialist at DIT conference – not necessarily presenting, just attending, what did they think?
  • ‘LILAC is a fantastic opportunity to meet like- minded professionals and develop your information literacy practices. However, LILAC is not just about the programme, there are plenty of opportunities for meeting old and new friends, networking…’ What associated professions, other than library/information specialists, were attending at LILAC? What did they think?Libcamp5Fri, May 20, 2016 – Irish TimesWhy we need more T-shaped graduates’

Opinion: Young workers who combine knowledge with an ability to collaborate across different disciplines are in high demand

  • Concerns are growing that education systems are failing to equip students with the knowledge and attributes they need to flourish in the workplace.
  • Following extensive consultation with employers nationally and internationally, we identified six key attributes (including communications, leadership, problem-solving, innovative mind-sets, global awareness), underpinned by specific proficiencies (such as digital literacy), that are fostered in all our students.
  • [DCU] From this year, all incoming students will be provided with an e-portfolio that will act as a digital archive of personal development and will be framed around the headings of the six generic attributes. What’s happening in your institution?
  • But, how do we get associated groups/stakeholders to engage/enable/support our initiatives?…Networking
  • Following Twitter, it appears that the same people/interested groups are talking, and interacting with each other, which is fab, but is it time that other associated groups, from outside the library sphere also joined your conversation…or are reminded to include you in theirs?
  • #Futurelibrary Vs. #wordcon (writers/literary conference) same day…being held in the NLI!) … ASTI conference also happening!
  • Was there a library/information specialist at these conferences? What did they think?
  • Was there a writer/literary festival volunteer or expert/teacher at #Futurelibrary? What did they think?

So, do you know —a relative, friend, neighbour, someone in your sports club, drama club, PTA, a committee you are on, stitch ‘n bitch group?! Who is a:

  • Teacher – Educate Together/ Early school leavers/ DEIS
  • Lecturer in yours, or another, institute of education
  • Career Guidance [use library story if time]
  • Someone involved in a committee in their particular profession
  • NALA volunteer/co-ordinator
  • Someone in Science
  • Medical field
  • Recruitment
  • Marketing/Communications
  • Colleague or lunch buddy involved in a different Dept/area within your organisation
  • Associated NGO – e.g. Fighting words, JobCare, SUI, [across whole demographic]
  • Grad Ireland
  • Organisers of a course/CPD you undertook, e.g. 12 Apps…
  • These are all people who have the potential to engage with libraries and recognise what libraries can offer in terms of education/skills/training :
  • As importantly/conversely they have a professional or social skills/connections and/or the professional/philanthropic/altruistic outlook to offer advice/feed-back and support to library initiatives…
  • But How?!! Engagement with associated professional fields, or advocacy groups. Show & Tell!
  • Ask! – I was delighted to be invited here today. People like to help! Or Tell! – leave the door open…

How:

  • Virtual: Know what’s going on in their world
  • Good Examples:
    • Books Upstairs (@BooksUpstairs) tweeted at 0:14 PM on Thu, May 19, 2016:
      “Bringing the mind-set of performance theatre production to literary events” @sarahkeegs @WordsIreland #wordcon
    • @gutterbookshop – masters of the network: but not crass & staying true to their community….involved in ILF Dublin & Dalkey Book Festival
  • Virtual: Let them know what is going on in your world that may be of interest in their world
  • Virtual ‘invitees’ to conferences – let them know about your # – offer to mail your follow-up slides that may be useful…encourage them to RT…
  • Real: Invite them to your workshops, think-ins, dare I say it, conferences: go to theirs!
  • Two for one entry? Bring a friend initiative?
  • Engage first…involve them…it may lead to a reciprocal arrangement…
  • And then, slowly, but surely, build on those relationships, expand what you’ve done in library/library school circles to neighbouring organisations!

Why?

  • You owe it to yourselves, and to future librarians/information specialists.
  • You have to show that your teaching initiatives, indeed, your library, or your role within an organisation has merit, and consequently receives the funding and recognition it deserves…it is within your power.
  • Otherwise, you are going to be dealing with ‘the Horse has bolted’ situation: initiatives such as # my library my right are worthy and correct, but, in my opinion, the damage is done, the horse has bolted, someone has closed the stable door…
  • Start the conversation, engage, show your knowledge, and show how you can help: take advice, observe what is going on in associated spheres. Learn as well as teach.
  • However, constant CPD/Certification/upskilling is not the only answer, [maybe sponsor a workshop for CPD on networking?]…
  • co-operate, and stay connected, that way, people are dealing with people, and not competing organisations/entities: competing for recognition and funding:
  • Show that Libraries are friendly allies, not the conquering or vanquished enemy: not a Trojan horse!

Feed-back: Comments from attendees to pitch:

  • [agree…librarians] ‘need to be less self-effacing’
  • [librarians] ‘are too humble’
  • [need to] ‘get out there…[show] their skills’
  • [demonstrate] ‘their added value’
  • [concern] ‘Use CPD for myself…attend conferences for me….’ [in response suggested that this could still be the case, but, perhaps also invite people to follow the twitter feed/# for the event]
  • [comment] ‘cross-pollination of ideas a good thing’
  • [Reaching out to others] ‘not just for events’…[Rudaí 23 had an educator involved [who] ‘added dimension’

Written by Carolanne McPartlan

Join us online for a Twitter chat on evidence-based librarianship on Thursday 30th June at 11am (BST)

We’re very excited to be collaborating  with our friends and colleagues in Australia: LARK Library Applied Research Kollektive to bring you a Twitter chat discussing a fantastic article on evidence-based librarianship by Denise Pan (Associate Dean for Collections and Content at University of Washington) and Zaana Howard (strategic designer and human-centred design coach). The article we’ve chosen describes a range of innovative research methods which can help to transform libraries into evidence-based communities of practice (scroll down for more info!)

#EBLIPRG

The Twitter group #EBLIPRG (Evidence-based Library and Information Practice Reading Group) began in August 2015, led by Suzana Sukovic, Fiona MacDonald and Liz Walkley Hall. They were inspired by the conversations that they’d had at the EBLIP8 Conference, and wanted to find a way to continue their discussions. And so their Twitter reading group began – a first for the Australian library community! (For the full back story, see here).


Check out #EBLIPRG on Twitter for a quick idea of what it’s all about.

If you’re new to Twitter chats you can find out how to  participate here, but the short story is it’s a great way to connect with other library professionals, researchers, students within your own network and around the World – anyone who’s on Twitter can have their say!


How to join:

  1. Read the article we’ve chosen to discuss (link to full-text, details, and abstract below!)

  2. Have a quick look at the discussion questions we’ve come up with

  3. Get online at 11am on Thursday 30th June and lurk, listen, join in!

  4. Make sure to use #EBLIPRG in your Tweets!

 


ARTICLE:
Pan, Denise & Howard, Zaana (2010) Distributing leadership and cultivating dialogue with collaborative EBIP. Library Management, 31(7), pp. 494-504.


Teaser1

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


1. Do you think the experience and knowledge of library staff is utilised by library management to make decisions?
2. The article describes a reorganisation of library staff and workflows to flatten the hierarchical structure & better reflect library priorities. Have you ever worked somewhere with a shared leadership culture?
How was it achieved?
3. What obstacles prevent a shared leadership culture from thriving?
4. What are the advantages/disadvantages of a distributed leadership model? (see pros and cons on p.7)
5. Have you or your organisation ever used an appreciative inquiry model to research your workplace, and if so, what were the results?
6. Where have you found a community of practice for librarians? (Associations, organisations, committees, groups, workplaces, ex-colleagues, etc.)
7. Think of three initiatives that could help convert your workplace into a knowledge creating community
8. The article acknowledges library personnel as assets by recognising that when libraries maximise the talents & skills of a diverse staff the organisation becomes responsive & innovative. Discuss.

Teaser2You can read more on the LARK blog or like their FB page to keep up with international trends in library research…

See you next Thursday!

LibCamp 2016 Programme is complete!

12 great pitches complete the programme for the afternoon with 4 happening at once!

Our amazing programme of pitches for #irelibcamp16 is now full and we are delighted with the variety and quality of the pitchers (see below)! We’ll continue to sell tickets until we’re sold out but  make sure to book your place soon to hear from all these great librarians and library advocates on how libraries can and do interact with teaching and learning in different settings!

LibCamp 2016 Programme

10 excellent reasons to drop what you’re doing and come to Library Camp

If you haven’t made up your mind yet whether to attend LibraryCamp this Saturday, read on for ten very good reasons why you should book your ticket and tell your friends to book theirs too. Apart from our crazy-bananas-good programme of pitchers talking about everything from social inclusion, tips and tools for teaching and how librarians can embrace their teaching role and gain professional recognition there’s a multitude of other good reasons to come…

#1. The venue!

#irelibcamp16 is taking place in The Student Common Room in Dublin Business School (on the 4th floor of Castle House building) on George Street. This central location is easy to get to and the Room is fitted out with with a grass floor, bean bags, sofas, various games (Jenga! darts!) and last but not least a big iPad type jukebox (5 songs for €1!)

Pitch - Katie Dickson#2. Find out how school librarians are coping with the challenges of classroom management and pedagogy in the library, as well as getting professional recognition

 

#3. A library-themed Quizz

Eh…who doesn’t love a good pub-quizz? this one will be a fun version based around the theme of libraries!

nerd

Pitch - Jack Hyland (1)#4. Try out a student-centred teaching tool called Peerwise that Jack Hyland is using in his classes with 3rd level students


Prosecco and cake#5. Cake and prosecco…need we say more?


 

 

#6. Hear about why Academic libraries are still a vital part of the infrastructure and support for teaching and learning in Higher Education in the age of Google with Siobhán Dunne

Pitch - Siobhan Dunne

#7. Discuss continuing professional development and pedagogy for librarians with Robert McKenna

Pitch - Rob McKenna

#8. Have your say on how libraries can fill gaps in the education system for those with special needs with Elaine Chapman

Pitch - Elaine Chapman

#9. Hear about teaching in Corporate and Legal libraries!Pitch - Niamh

 

Pitch - Gen#10. Catch up on what you missed or discuss what you learned at LILAC 2016 in UCD!

 

 

 

 

#11. Socialising/meeting peers/networking…the pub afterwards!

We will be following the day’s learning with a few drinks in a local bar on Georges St. (location TBA) where you can mix and mingle with the group.


Ok so that’s more than 10 – plus there’s more!

We still have a few excellent pitches up our sleeve – stay tuned to find out which brilliant librarians from public, academic and special libraries will be giving their take on the teaching role of libraries and librarians on the 21st May! Check out the pitches as they role in on our Pitches page and then head straight over to Eventbrite to book your tickets.

#irelibcamp16 FTW!

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Booking Live for #irelibcamp16

Booking has gone live! get your ticket for Lib Camp 2016 through Eventbrite

LibCamp_Banner_Updated

 

We’ve worked hard at trying to make it as interesting as possible – we have some great pitches lined up (see them on the Pitches page!) as well as some fun activities (think quizzes! cake-eating! prosecco!) in the fantastic Dublin Business School. You’ll get to network with other librarians and students and if you decide to pitch get some great experience public speaking. If pitching isn’t for you come along on the day and join in the discussions!

As always you can tweet your thoughts throughout the day #irelibcamp16

Get your ticket now to avoid disappointment!

 

 

Call for Pitches

Call-for-pithces-LibCampAre all librarians teachers?

As you might have heard, Library Camp is back on the 21st May in Dublin Business School with a fun mix-up of discussions, pitches, and a library quiz! Are you new to speaking openly about your love of all things library-related and looking for a relaxed environment in which to cut your public-speaking teeth? Or perhaps you’ve been teaching for years in your library and are exasperated by the lack of recognition? Maybe you see new avenues and collaborations for librarians to exploit or have seen or heard of interesting new ways of engaging people in learning? Maybe you want to talk about how librarians can tackle a lack of formal teacher-training and still meet/exceed expectations? Maybe you just want to meet others in your field and eat cake? Now’s your chance! You have until the 16th May to be accepted but the slots are filling up so don’t miss out on this fun and valuable professional development opportunity!

You’ll have up to 25 mins, a flip-chart and some markers to lead a discussion or play a game or talk about how the worlds of teaching and librarianship combine. Maybe co-host a pitch if you’re feeling a bit lonely!

Submit a pitch (a paragraph or two) outlining your topic to laicareerdevelopment@gmail.com and we’ll get back to you within a few days – your pitch will be added to our Pitches for 2016 page shortly after. Want examples? See our What to Pitch and How Library Camp works pages.

 

Library Camp is back in May – pitches at the ready!

We have great news – LAICDG Library Camp is back in May! in collaboration with the wonderful Dublin Business School  and our friends in A&SL, who’ve pitched in on the last three LibCamps (haha geddit??)  we’re bringing you hot topics, discussion, peer-to-peer learning and (of course) edible treats* !

Pencil it into your diaries – we’ll be announcing a range of exciting pitches soon. Following on from the brilliant LILAC 2016 conference in UCD (which many couldn’t make it to), this year we’re posing an open-ended (and provocative) question to get you all thinking about what you’d like to talk about: are all librarians teachers? See why you should attend and even consider pitching on our Library Camp 2016 page.

LibCamp_Banner_Updated


  • When: Saturday May 21st 2016, 12 noon – 4pm
  • Where: Dublin Business School
  • Booking: BOOK HERE!

This is an “unconference”, a gathering without set speakers where people come together to discuss what is most important to them about libraries. You might like to pitch about how librarians contribute to education, literacy, community engagement etc. Or you might have a strong opinion on the challenges of teaching in any number of library settings…perhaps you think there’s too much emphasis on teaching in librarianship and we should concentrate on our core librarian skills…or is teaching a core librarian skill? It’s up to you to pick your angle!

We need you to send us your pitches on the topic – for lots of ideas see our What to Pitch page. And if you need a bit of convincing that pitching at Library Camp is something you could do, or just want more info then see our How Library Camp works page.
Send us an email (laicareerdevelopment@gmail.com) and let us know your thoughts. We’ll be adding pitches to the site (see our Pitches page) as we receive them so check back here over the next few weeks to get a taste of what you can look forward to on the 21st May!
cakes libcamp 15

Mmmm…cake

*It is acceptable to come just for the treats.

Publish to Flourish: An Leabharlann and beyond!… event recap

NGI prosecco colourSparkling prosecco and old master paintings provided the lavish setting for last week’s highly successful CDG event. Held in the National Gallery of Ireland’s Lavery Room, usually the gallery’s luxurious venue for corporate launches and weddings, the evening consisted of a series of talks by established and up-and-coming authors working in the library profession. Entitled “Publish to Flourish: An Leabharlann and Beyond”, about 40 attendees listened to a series of speakers who gave important advice including pitching ideas for articles and books, as well as writing techniques, tips, as well as the vital “do’s and don’ts”. Chair, Marta Bustillo, welcomed the attendees and first up was Marjory Sliney, who as editor of An Leabharlann, gave handy hints on writing for the LAI, recommending the need to keep book reviews and conference reports concise (<500 words), and emphasised the importance of reviewing past issues of the publication to get a feel for format and style. Back-issues can be consulted either in print or online (LAI/CILIP Ireland members have immediate access by logging into the site; non-members can access up to six months ago) through the LAI website/CILIP Ireland website via eDeposit Ireland. The CDG committee is now involved in the Open Access management of An Leabharlann and were delighted to celebrate this at the event.

speakers

Speakers at #cdgp2f included (left to right) Aoife Lawton, Alex Kouker, Senan Healy, Colm O’Connor, Marjory Sliney, Amye Quigley and Laura Zaliene

Aoife Lawton, Systems Librarian at the HSE, then provided a presentation on general advice for novice writers, specifically on publishing and then gave some information on how she wrote her book “The Invisible Librarian”. I asked a question in the Q&A about how it was possible to manage the writing of a book, and Aoife explained that it meant sacrificing a lot of free time, but that the pay-off was more than worth it in terms of career progression, and making your mark. Crowd at talkColm O’Connor, Information Resources Librarian at the RCSI then gave a presentation on articles he has had published in medical journals, and the triumphs (and pit-falls) of collaboration with co-authors. Next up, Senan Healy, Head Librarian and Information Systems Manager in the RDS, gave insight into how as a librarian he had once pitched an article to colleagues using “librarian jargon”, and his text was rejected. He then explained the vital importance of writing for your audience and tailoring your texts to meet the reading and comprehension levels of readers from different disciplines. Two members of the CDG committee then gave talks on their writing for An Leabharlann; Laura Zaliene, Library assistant at UCD, and Amye Quigley, Librarian at Wicklow Co. Public Libraries. Both Laura and Amye stressed the importance of venturing into the world of writing and publishing as an important step in library career development and progression. Last but not least, Alex Kouker, Research Librarian at Dublin Business School, gave an interesting insight into a new journal which he manages with an editorial team; “Studies in Art and Humanities”.Alex  Alex focused on articles from the point of view of commissioning editors and stressed the importance of adhering to style guides, and gave some salutatory advice to rejected contributors: if you can’t beat ‘em, then blog your own articles (write for LibFocus or for the CDG blog!), and better still, start up your own journal! Alex also considered the perspective of the author and the idea of self-regulated learning when writing for publication.

The event was a wonderful evening, meeting new people working in librarianship, and hearing from a range of enterprising and motivated colleagues – see the Storify here. Marta wrapped up the evening by letting everyone know that the CDG’s next networking event will be at the annual LibCamp, which this year will be held at Dublin Business School on the 21st May 2016. Tickets (and more details) will be available online soon, so mark this date in your diary. See you there!

Pub networking 1

Andrew Moore

Library assistant, National Gallery of Ireland

Publish to flourish-Banner-Twitter

 

Spring Event: Publish to flourish: An Leabharlann and beyond!

 

Publish to flourish-Banner-TwitterWe are beyond excited to announce our next event, the first of 2016: “Publish to flourish: An Leabharlann and beyond”. This is to mark a new role for the CDG: we’re uploading articles from An Leabharlann: The Irish Library to eDeposit Ireland, TCD’s home for Ireland’s electronic publications. As many of you already know, An Leabharlann is jointly published by The Library Association of Ireland and CILIP Ireland twice a year in March and October, and is always packed full of interesting articles, conference and book reviews, mostly from practising Irish librarians. Only members of CILIP and the LAI can access the current issue but all back issues are now Open Access and can be accessed via eDeposit Ireland through the LAI website.

publish to flourish cartoonThe second reason we chose the theme of getting published is because it is increasingly becoming the norm for go-getting librarians in academic, special, public, health, and other libraries. While some Irish information professionals are busy gathering healthy portfolios of publications on their work, projects they’ve managed, or one of the many strands of LIS literature, many (including some of us!) have yet to break into this important area of reflective practice. Not only is getting published a career-booster, it also documents and reflects emerging issues that many of us as practitioners will face someday or are already facing in our workplaces, and sharing our experiences is therefore good practice and helps get the word out about all the great work happening in Irish libraries.

In 2009 Helen Fallon wrote:

Writing for publication is an accepted and expected part of the role of lecturing staff in Irish universities. No such recognition of the librarian as an academic writer exists. Many Irish librarians are actively involved in local and national working groups dealing with the major library issues of the day. They regularly present at national and international conferences, conduct local and national surveys and engage in a range of interesting and innovative practice and research-related activities. Despite this wealth of knowledge, skills and experience, very few Irish academic librarians publish in the peer-reviewed literature. There may be a certain paradox in that while librarians support and promote scholarship across all disciplines, they are generally not actively encouraged to see writing and creating the literature of these disciplines as part of their role within the University (Fallon, 2009).

Building on the excellent and pioneering work of Helen Fallon (NUIM) and others such as Marjory Sliney (editor of An Leabharlann) and Jane Burns (RCSI), who have in recent years done amazing work encouraging Irish librarians to contribute to the academic and professional literature, we decided we’d like to hear a series of lightning talks where authors shared their experiences and practical tips in an informal and friendly setting. To that end, we’ve asked a range of illustrious library and information professionals from no.5 Clare street, NGIdifferent sectors (Alex Kouker, DBS; Colm O’Connor, RCSI; Senan Healy, RDS; Aoife Lawton, HSE, and many more!*) to come to No. 5 South Leinster Street (the Lavery Room), to the right of the National Gallery of Ireland on the eve of Thurs 7th April to speak for either 10 or 5 minutes each on a number of different topics (for example turning thesis topics into articles, writing conference and book reviews, and collaborating on articles remotely, as well as how getting published has enhanced their own careers). For the very low price of €11.43 (for the waged) or €6.13 (for students/unwaged), you can hear their advice and ask them questions in the beautiful surrounds of the NGI, with discussions and socialising before, during and after!

We know you have articles and reports lurking inside you waiting to get out so join us in the NGI on the 7th April and learn how to set them free! It promises to be a fun and informative night – get your ticket on Eventbrite ASAP so you don’t miss out.

*see the full programme below (may be subject to minor changes):

Programme

5:30 – 6pm: Registration

6pm – 6:05 Marta Bustillo, Chair of CDG: Introduction

6.05 – 6:15 Marjory Sliney, Editor, An Leabharlann: “How to start writing for An Leabharlann”

6:15 – 6:25 Aoife Lawton, Systems Librarian at Health Service Executive & Author of “The Invisible Librarian”: “Publishing for Librarians: Reflections from an Author”

6:25 – 6:35: Colm O’Connor, Information Resources Librarian, RCSI: “Collaborating on a paper – why & how”

6:35 – 6:40 Senan Healy, Library & Information Systems Manager, RDS: “Writing for your audience”

6:40 – 6:45 Laura Zaliene, Library Assistant, UCD: “Thesis to article: the value of collaboration”

6:45 – 6:50 Amye Quigley, Executive Librarian, Wicklow County Council Library Service: “Confessions of an accidental writer”

6:50 – 6:55 Alexander Kouker, Research Librarian, Dublin Business School: “Getting published”

6:55 – 7:15 pm Questions & wrap-up

7:15pm Close

From 7:15pm Socialising in the Mont Clare Hotel