L2L: Librarians learning to support learning Seminar in DIT

New DIT Campus in Grangegorman

New DIT campus in Grangegorman , photo available at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/14995046247

On the 27th of June on the newly developed DIT campus in Grangegorman, a range of librarians and colleagues from Higher Education came together to hear about and discuss L2L (Librarians learning to support learners learning); a two year project which plans to explore the application of the National professional development framework for all staff who teach in Higher Education to the work of teaching librarians.
This project promises to result in a framework which academic librarians can use to guide their own professional pedagogical development and tangible, demonstrable evidence of professional development (such as digital badges or awards). One of the major draws of the project (spear-headed by Dundalk Institute of TechnologyInstitute of Technology Carlow, & Dublin Institute of Technology) is the proposed development of a vibrant and inclusive community of practice which can share the issues, challenges and best practices particular to the work of teaching librarians. Herein lies the real value of the project for me and other academic librarians who may work in small institutions and yearn for a network of like-minded practitioners with whom to share our successes and failures in the hope of improving and developing our praxis.
Funded by the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund, the project also allows librarians working in Higher Education in Ireland to develop a shared language and currency with their academic colleagues which will hopefully promote a deeper understanding of the meaning and value of our work with the students and staff in our institutions: information literacy (and a range of other academic, digital, and meta-literacies) -concepts  which can be difficult to articulate and to measure in practice.
 
The day began with a presentation by Roisín Donnelly (currently on a year’s secondment to the National Forum from the Dublin Institute of Technology, where she has worked for 17 years as an Academic Developer), who explained the background of the Framework and the project in general, as well as how professional development can transform roles and identities. She described forms of non-accredited professional development activities which many of us engage in regularly without any formal recognition. These activities include (but aren’t limited to) reflective practices such as the creation/maintenance of learning/teaching portfolios, blogs and journals.
Next up was Dr. Claire McGuinness, who helped to contextualise the project by giving an enlightening talk on the past, present and potential future of teaching librarians globally and in Ireland. She described research which explored the teaching aspects of the academic librarian role and identity with all of its complexities, uncertainties and cross-functionalities. The concept of information literacy is (as she said) ‘nebulous’ and has received a mixed reception outside of academic library circles. Some of the research she cited was familiar to me but much of it was not – and I left with notes packed with useful references.
Before lunch, Dr. Ashley O’Donoghue (Head of Staff Learning and Development at DIT) gave a short talk on the importance of professional development both for individuals and for knowledge organisations. She highlighted research which showed that training and development opportunities are a determining factor in the retention of highly-motivated employees (Boxall et al, 2003) – and also provide a major attraction for managers to draw new staff to their organisations. Frameworks such as those being developed to support the National PD Framework play a vital role in mapping  clear career development and progression within key sectors in Higher Education.
After a generous lunch we were encouraged to participate in discussion on the Framework and the L2L project in a ‘World Café‘. Groups discussed questions such as ‘How do your libraries contribute to T&L in your organisation?’, ‘How do you see your role as a teacher?’, and ‘How do you think the L2L project might help you in your role?’ (paraphrased), with each group mapping their ideas onto large paper, hung around the room. Afterwards we had the chance to circle the room and write our feedback to each group poster with post-its.

contributing to T&L L2L 2contribution to T&L L2Llibrarians as teachers L2Lrole as teacher L2L

The day wrapped up with a helpful Q&A session chaired by Dr. Mary Delaney (Head of Library and Information Services at IT Carlow) who answered questions from the floor regarding the other groups (apart from academic librarians) who were developing projects around the Framework, and what form the ‘communities of practice’ mentioned in the L2L leaflet might take. It’s hoped that there might be avenues of communication and collaboration between this new initiative and other interested parties such as the Library Association of Ireland which might help to provide pathways of sustainability into the future.
Overall the day was an extremely positive experience, with a good mix of discussion and explanation and the L2L project looks and sounds like it will be a very fruitful collaboration amongst academic librarians and between libraries and our colleagues in Higher Education which should promote dialogue around the role and identity of teaching librarians. Presentations from the day and updates about the project will be posted on http://www.teachingandlearning.ie/l2l-librarians-learning-support-learners-learning/. You can also follow developments on the project’s Facebook page and Twitter feed.
Post by Genevieve Larkin, Assistant Librarian in Marino Institute of Education

Librarian as Researcher – HSLG Workshop

 

hslg-logo-165pxOn the 17th December 2015, Rosarie Coughlan (Scholarly Publishing Librarian at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada) facilitated a custom-made HSLG workshop “The Librarian as Researcher” in UCD, Belfield, which was well-attended and enjoyed by a mix of librarians from different sectors. In her current role, Rosarie manages the University library’s journal hosting service and institutional repository and coordinates library support to graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Her previous roles include Information Literacy Co-ordination Librarian at Concordia University, Montreal, and Research support Librarian at NUI Galway.

The first part of the day was dedicated to the theme of ‘Librarian as Researcher’ and began with Rosarie describing the key differences between academic librarianship in Ireland and North America, including the obligation for librarians to publish when seeking tenure in North American Universities and the right to ‘academic freedom’ that faculty (and librarians) enjoy in some institutions. ‘Academic freedom’ allows researchers to develop, explore and disseminate research “regardless of prescribed or official doctrine and without limitation or constriction by institutional censorship.” This stimulated an interesting discussion on whether librarian-led research is valued in the same way as that

Why librarians conduct research

Why Librarians research – group discussion

of other researchers, and how we can balance institutional priorities and individual research priorities given time constraints and other professional commitments. Workshop participants discussed current research plans and the reasons why they personally engaged in research – which revolved around the desire to ground practice in evidence-based decisions and to affect positive change within health, education and special library contexts. Many participants felt that the professional development and research that they undertook had to be carefully balanced with supporting the research needs of scholars and practitioners in our organisations. Continue reading

Erasmus+ Staff Mobility for Librarians

Some of the beautiful architecture in Prague

Some of the beautiful architecture in Prague

Did you know if you’re working in an academic library you might be eligible to apply for an Erasmus+ Staff mobility trip which would allow you to go to a participating University library in Europe (and beyond) for training and CPD purposes? I’ve recently returned from a trip to Charles University in Prague where I participated in an exchange of best practice with other librarians. Over one working week my host librarians at the university showed me around several satellite libraries located in Prague and the Central Library where I gave a presentation on my work in Cregan Library in St. Patrick’s College.

Charles University

The Faculty of Arts of Charles University

Founded in 1348, Charles University was the first in Central Europe and now ranks in the upper 1.5 percent of the world’s best universities. The libraries of the university are ‘decentralised’ – each of its 17 faculties has its own main library as well as department and campus libraries. They have 83,169 users and 214 full-time library employees.


Why go?

Service desk on the ground floor of the Czech National Library of Technology

Service desk on the ground floor of the Czech National Library of Technology

It’s always a good idea to step outside of your own cultural and institutional bubble to see how libraries and info services operate in different contexts. As well as many of the libraries of Charles University, I also visited the National Library of the Czech Republic, the Czech National Library of Technology and the Municipal Library. In each place we were treated to insider information on the history and development of services, and the successes and challenges encountered by library staff.  From beautiful installations, architecture and sculptures, and the innovative design of library spaces to the technical and user issues that colleagues have faced, I came away from my trip bursting with ideas, photos, notes and slides, as well as a new international perspective on librarianship.


Prague National Library reading rooms

Study rooms in the Czech National Library

I highly recommend applying if your institution participates – I found it to be a very worthwhile learning experience and it enabled me to build up some contacts with colleagues in Prague and also in Kraków (there was a group of Polish librarians from the Pedagogical University of Kraków on Erasmus at the same time as me). You can receive some expenses (for travel, accommodation and food) by completing the relevant documentation and providing receipts.


How it works:

  • If you work in an academic library apply to the international office in your institution
  • Pick your destination from a list of participating institutions
  • You will be supplied with an application form – complete it with an eye to international cooperation and collaboration/best practice
  • If you are successful you will be expected to make contact with your proposed host institution to arrange the details and itinerary of your visit
  • You will usually be given an allowance for expenditure
  • Start booking flights and hotels
  • Keep all your receipts and travel stubs, as you will need them to claim money back
  • Prepare a presentation on your own Library (making sure to include info about yourself)
  • Remember to bring something for your host institution (like Irish sweets or publications from your home library)
  • Take lots of photos and notes so that you can share info with colleagues when you return
  • Don’t forget to swap contact details/connect on LinkedIn with the people you meet
  • Enjoy! Take in some of the cultural highlights and local food
  • For more information about Erasmus+ see here.

    Me with colleagues from the Pedagogical University of Kraków

    Me with colleagues from the Pedagogical University of Kraków and Charles University

ANLTC’s event on Library Impact and Assessment: an overview.

Author: Michelle Breen / @mbreen2

The ANLTC (Academic & National Libraries Training Cooperative) held an event on Library Impact and Assessment in Trinity College Dublin on May 7th 2013. The assembled library staff from DIT, the Irish universities, the Universities of Huddersfield and Leicester discussed the impact analysis work underway at their institutions. With attrition rates of 8% in the Universities and 22% in the Institutes of Technology (IoTs) there is a lot to be concerned about. Here is a summary of the day.

ANLTC logo

Carmel O’Sullivan (UCD) introduced the day by reminding us how high up the higher education national agenda the topics of assessment and measurement are. The first speaker, Mary Antonesa from NUIM, reported on the 2012 CONUL ACIL survey. Mary reported that students indicated a preference for library workshops, advice and lectures, in that order. The survey found that the more explicit a library is about learning outcome the more successful the IL intervention is likely to be. The results also indicated that faculty view the Library as having a positive impact on grades. The final report of this survey was sent to CONUL and the questions used in the survey are available in the report.

Lorna Dodd from UCD reported on the findings of a survey delivered to 1,900 module coordinators in UCD in 2012. With reorganization and staff attrition UCD has 6 college librarians where they once had 15-17 liaison librarians. These librarians still serve the same user population but could not continue to do IL the way they always did. Among the changes put in place for IL delivery was a shift from a module to a programme approach, library staff no longer involved in tours, provided active learning tailored to specific subject needs; including online offerings.

students

Ciara McCaffrey (UL) reported on the experience of Irish libraries that ran LibQual, the ARL student satisfaction survey. The libraries interviewed reported LibQual’s greatest selling point as its ability to generate data that allows libraries to compare themselves with others, and yourself, over time. The results achieved by Irish libraries in LibQual indicate that our library buildings are coming up short in terms of ‘customer’ expectations of them. Not surprisingly for many CONUL members, noise also continues to be a concern for library users. There is a lot of data in LibQual that we are not utilizing fully at present; there is scope there to do more with the data. Ciara called for another CONUL notebook so that we get a measure of how Irish libraries are doing now.

Huddersfield logo

Graham Stone from the University of Huddersfield gave a very detailed presentation about the JISC funded Library Impact Data Project. University libraries in Wollongong and Minnesota are getting similar results to Graham’s so there is some support internationally for the theory that “there is a statistically significant correlation across a number of universities between library activity data and student attainment”

There were many revealing insights turned up by this very extensive data gathering process from 2,000 students in the UK including:

· Students are more likely to drop out of their course if they had not borrowed or used library e-resources

· Students that use VLE middle of night are at risk (Manchester Metropolitan Univ)

·The same correlation could not be made about students using the library in the middle of the night

· Business students do not use as many books as we thought they did although they ask for more books – maybe their expectations of the library are very low?

· Chinese students use fewer e-resources, generally, than other nationalities, is this because of a tendency to do group work, share a resource?

· Computer Systems students not using library resources but still getting their degrees, should they be participating in ‘good academic practice’ and reading appropriate material? Their lecturers are compiling relevant reading lists.

Lamp logo

The latest project that Graham is involved with is called LAMP and this will attempt to create a dashboard where data collected centrally can be used to flag a problem or pattern in student behaviour or engagement with services, initially at University of Manchester & Huddersfield.
Jonathan Drennan from UCD reported on the design and implementation of the first Irish National Student Survey. The Irish survey emulated the AUSSE (Australian Survey of Student Engagement); a 120 question survey that measure the extent to which students are engaged in good educational practices. Results of the survey will be available to institutions in September. Jonathan referenced a book called Ivory Tower Blues by James E Cote. According to Jonathan, there are interesting parallels between the Irish and Canadian education systems particularly as it relates to the transition from secondary level to third level education.

Jo Aitkins from the University of Leicester described how the simple interventions made in her library can be replicated elsewhere to improve services for students:

· Allow feedback on the chat function

· Distribute Happy Cards periodically

· Get Student’s Union to run a survey for you

Jo offered a very practical tip to anyone planning to run a survey; before running a survey tell them what you’ve done out of last survey, in a ‘You said, we did’ style of communication.

Peter Corrigan from NUIG described ways he believes we can run the LibQual survey more efficiently. NUIG runs LibQual every year and Peter believes this helps them to mature the process and therefore do it faster each time. In his assessment of tools for analysing the qualitative data from LibQual (the comments) Peter looked at 3 tools:

· Max QDA

· ATLAS ti

· NVIVO

None of these tools have advanced text analysis like Google offers but of the three; NVIVO is currently the most flexible option.

Stitched Panorama

Summary
If awareness raising was the goal of this ANLTC event this was certainly achieved. I felt that we were left with as many questions as we got answers. The speakers described the many connections that exist between libraries and student success but it was made clear at the outset that while there is a correlation between library activities and student success, causation can’t always be inferred.

The results of the first Irish National Student Survey will be an interesting set of data to look at when thinking about library usage as it relates to student attainment. Data collected from UCD students last year suggests we should give strong consideration to continuing tours of the library. Lorna (UCD) reported that while students may request tours they may be doing this in a ‘box-ticking’ way rather than with any real purpose. The UCD survey found that tours featured behind workshops as students preferred means of getting library instruction. Our colleagues at Leicester and Huddersfield also reported the demise of tours in their libraries.

The attendance and level of interest among yesterday’s attendees highlights that within the assessment community there is an appetite for collaboration in this area. Using the knowledge and experience of the CONUL Task & Finish Group on Metrics and perhaps looking outside the traditional library skill set might be a next step for a collaborative effort to advance the excellent analytics work already underway.

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