Lead to Succeed: a vision for Irish libraries

Need an inspiring library event to ease you into Autumn? The CDG is proud to present this year’s seminar/AGM in association with the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Library – Lead to Succeed: a vision for Irish libraries.
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This half-day seminar will focus on sharing experience and knowledge in Irish libraries with a focus on leadership in times of change. It will be opened by keynote speaker Mr. John Lonergan (former Governor of Mountjoy Prison) who speaks passionately on social-justice issues, the importance of maintaining a work-life balance and community-building within your organisation. We’re also excited to announce speakers from four different Irish libraries and further details will be released here over the next few weeks.


When: Friday 14th October 2016 9.30am – 4pm

Where: RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland), 123 Saint Stephen’s Green, Dublin


Lunch will be provided and you’re welcome to head off after or stay on for the LAI CDG AGM 2016 with reports by committee officers on a busy year of events and activities as well as our plans for the future, and of course our ritual networking in the local pub!

Get your tickets now so you’re not disappointed!

Lead to Succeed: a vision for Irish libraries/CDG AGM 2016

€12 for students/unwaged
€20 for LAI members
€30 for non-LAI members
(plus booking fee)

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Library Camp 2016 Review

Written by Lara Musto

Despite its name Library Camp does not imply camping in a library with a sleeping bag and a tent! It’s known as an “unconference”  – an informal gathering where experienced and new professionals alike share their ideas; or it can be seen as a springboard to your future in public speaking! The Career Development Group in collaboration with the Academic and Special Libraries group of the LAI (A&SL) have been organising library camp since 2013.

regThanks to DBS Library, this year the LAI CDG and the A&SL were able to hold library camp at Castle House in the Common Room on 21st May. The venue got the thumbs up by attendees, with bean-bags and comfy sofas widely appreciated –  according to the tweets on the day! On Twitter the event ranked fourth in Dublin for a while! Past camps used to start with a speed networking type of session to break the ice amongst participants. Instead this year a quiz was introduced with prosecco for everyone in the audience. The questions covered general knowledge and only one was about librarianship. The innovation was approved by seasoned attendees and by newcomers alike. The lucky (aka the nerdiest) team – Going Postal – won a golden ticket for a free entrance to one of next year’s LAI CDG events. After 3 rounds there was only half mark of difference between the first two teams. A combination of prosecco and networking made the game highly competitive amongst the 8 teams!P1060804B

Then being slightly chirpy but still focused, it was time for the first set of pitches. The marketing campaign for lib camp generally includes the theme and starts a couple of months before the date. This year the subject was a direct question: Are all librarians teacher librarians? Pitches are emailed to the LAI CDG for approval – there is no need to set up a group of slides, because a pitch is carried out with a flip chart, a marker and any other prop selected by the pitcher. Being an open space event, participants can wander in and out of a pitch as they pleased. This year there were so many pitches that it was decided to run 4 pitches at one time, to give each one an opportunity to speak. Each pitch tends to be very lively; it lasts approximately 30 minutes and if you feel lonely you could ask a colleague to co-host. In three years there have been pitches with games, with group work and some with animated discussions.

If you pitch or sit at a pitch you won’t have time to get bored at Library camp! Library camp is known for baking an interesting pitch to entertain a small group of participants and also a cake (savoury or sweet) to help fuel the hungry crowd. However, for those who are timid at showing off their baking skills, there is always the option of topping up the wide variety of food (or drink) items brought in for the occasion. The brain needs to be fed to function properly and to face the rest of the pitches lined up for the day! This year it was worth a king’s ransom sitting on a bean bag or on one of those sofas in the Common Room, sipping away at prosecco or tea/coffee, stuffing your face with so many goodies and your brain with a mammoth of useful info about teaching and librarianship. So roll on next year’s edition!pub libcamp

For more, see our Storify of the event here, our friends at SLIP’s Storify here, and the CDG Flickr account for more photos!

Lara Musto

Adaptive teaching: the role of libraries in special education

By Elaine Chapman

My pitch at Library Camp this year was an interactive pitch that was designed to question what up and coming professionals in the library world know about interacting with users with disabilities.

I specifically wanted to question how we can learn, as a profession, to be better able to adapt our services towards users who are currently under-served.

My belief is that the way forward for libraries is to use outreach to market ourselves. The best way of bringing new people in to our world us to get out there and show them what we can do for them. The key to this is the ability to be adaptable, so that we can best meet the needs of individual users.

Elaine's pitch 2

Many people forget that the majority of people with disabilities are adults, not children, but most of the non-residential services for disabled people are aimed at children and their families.

Disabled adults are often forgotten about, but I believe libraries can help fix this through adapting our services for them and making use of outreach to market ourselves as mentioned above.

With that in mind, I came up with the questions listed below.

These are the main questions I want to ask
-Are libraries doing all that we can for users with disabilities?
-Do you think budgetary issues impact on library services to peripheral groups? Are there ways around this?
-Do you know how to approach or help a disabled user? Would your library consider staff training on this?
-Do you consider your library fully accessible for those with disabilities? Consider visual and sensory disabilities as well as physical.
-Do you think that current and future librarians should be taught adaptive teaching?

I am not going to give you the answers to the questions listed above as I had one more purpose in giving this talk, and that was purely to get you thinking on these issues, because the more they are thought about, the quicker they are solved.

That said, I will give one example of how current programmes can be adapted to better help all  users, but especially those with disabilities. That example lies with the reading programmes for children that many libraries operate. Introducing the use of a therapy animal in these programmes benefits literacy levels, but for children with autism, it can also have a huge impact on relieving social anxieties. Plus, who doesn’t want a library cat? Or dog, if we must!

Finally, I would like to say a massive thank you to Marta Bustillo, Therese Kelly, and the CDG. I could not have done it without you! They took a quiet autistic girl, and enabled  her to spread her wings. Now we just need to do that for others.

Elaine's pitch

Written by Elaine Chapman

Lessons learned at LibCamp 2016 and LILAC 2016

By Genevieve Larkin

 

My Pitch at LibCamp this year was two things. On the one hand it described a few of the highlights of LILAC 2016 (which I attended thanks to sponsorship from the ever-supportive Academic and Special Libraries Section of the LAI), and on the other it was an attempt to generate some discussion on how teaching librarians could support each-other in Ireland by forming a community of practice.

gen pitch 4

Challenges:

Mapping to standards

Challenges that I face (and I’m sure I’m not alone) include the formidable one of mapping any teaching I do to internationally recognised professional standards. Having studied information literacy standards and models during my M.Sc LIS I know what’s out there and which ones I like (ACRL’s framework for information literacy for higher education and ANZIL) but the more conceptual aspects of these models can make generating meaningful learning outcomes and content for classes time-consuming and tricky.

Lesson planning

This is where good lesson planning comes in – concepts familiar to educators such as learning outcomes, scaffolding, sequencing and assessment can all seem baffling but they are the tools of the trade and allow you to structure what you’re doing so that it makes sense for learners.

Support structures

For those of us working outside of traditional University support structures (which come with perks such as in-house teaching and learning support/training) it can seem doubly-daunting and we must find help where we can – from instructional designers and academics to the internet and each-other!

Other duties

Most librarians have other duties in addition to the teaching aspect of their roles – such as management of electronic resources and institutional repositories, website and social media maintenance, outreach, acquisitions, etc. (the list goes on!)

Solutions:

The solutions I’ve come up with so far are the following:

My Highlights of LILAC 2016:

Instructional Design and how to apply it to IL work

Instructional design is the process of analysing learning needs and goals and the development of a delivery system to meet those needs. I came across Kimberley Mullins IDEA model at LILAC which she has adapted to allow librarians to integrate information literacy into most courses. She provides templates for the stages: interviewing, designing, embedding and assessing. I hope to try this approach with my first embedded course. You can see her slides from LILAC here.gen pitch 2

Reflecting on my imposter syndrome

During Char Booth‘s inspiring keynote speech at LILAC she talked about the journey from librarian to teacher to administrator – planning and overseeing information literacy programmes. She eloquently described how pushing yourself outside your comfort zone can be a “heinous trauma.” This was by far my favourite part of the whole conference as I (and the rest of the audience!) identified strongly with her brave acknowledgement of the fear that many of us have at some time felt about learning to teach. Later on I found her blog-post on banishing your professional imposter here. Top tips from Char:

  1. “Cultivate experiences that rip you out of your comfort zone while still providing support
  2. Be mentored and seek mentees
  3. Challenge your perceived limitations
  4. Build a community of allies…”

I think all of these are highly applicable to teaching librarians. Find Char’s LILAC slides here.

Researching your practice

The importance of taking the time and effort to research and reflect upon your practice came up time and again at LILAC as the main differentiator between meaningful engagement with our colleagues and students and just rehashing mistakes while failing to capitalise on user needs and preferences. Some key trends in library research evidenced at the conference were:

Ethnographic research in libraries (or UX) involves taking an ethnographic approach to library service design –  in other words, thinking like a student instead of presuming to know what they want/need etc. It did occur to me that it might be very difficult to use this approach in a small or special library context.

Librarians doing doctorates: Why? Because this allows us to base our practice in evidence or at the very least to deepen our understanding of the research process. Why not? I’ve had this discussion with lots of librarians and the reasons are many: time/expense/the perils of over-qualification etc…doctorates are not for everyone!

Appreciative inquiry allows the researcher to embrace the positive, start from what the library is doing right, what you want to retain, what the ideal outcome of your activities would be, and how to reach as close to that as possible.

Gen pitch 3

Brainstorming on creating a community of practice for instructional librarians using appreciative inquiry Qs

“Communities of practice” were made famous by Wenger and are often the focus of educational research. For this brainstorm, we collected ideas on how to create a local community of practice for instructional librarians. There were many imaginative and exciting ideas, with Marie O’Neill from DBS Library suggesting DBS as a meeting place for a group of like-minded librarians who would like to come together to share their methods and resources. We also thought about a repository of open access materials such as lesson plans for librarians which could be hosted by eDeposit Ireland. Michelle Dalton (LibFocus/UCD Library) pointed out the opportunity for further TeachMeets in UCD Library after a successful one run a few years ago. I came away feeling there was great scope for building a COP and lots of potential ways to actively support each-other. See further ideas generated in the snapshot below:

Libcamp pitch flipchart

Flipchart from brainstorming activity on creating a community of practice for instructional librarians

Written by Genevieve Larkin

LibCamp 2016: A Reflection

by Carolanne McPartlan

Presenting at Library Camp this year was a very different experience: last year I was in the middle of my wonderful six-week work experience placement, in the Cregan Library in St. Patrick’s College, DCU; this year I pitched from the perspective of a library advocate, with an outside perspective and opinion, on how librarians should use networking, and cross-discipline collaboration, to further their role as teachers. The afternoon was both interesting, and most definitely, rewarding.  I put forward my thoughts and observations below. Librarians, you do a very valuable job: ‘May the Force Be with You’… Always.

Libcamp12

The main points of my pitch were:

  • I passionately believe that in a true republic, where education should be available to all of the people, equally, libraries are both central, and essential.
  • However, I have been thinking that librarians should be involved wherever, and whenever, possible in the wider skills/ teaching/academic world: at local/grass-roots level, in addition to a national level.
  • People on the floor/at the coal-face are powerful, and need to feel engaged and empowered.
  • Having followed various #’s of library/information, academic/student, and Career/Guidance Counsellor’s workshops/conferences, it seems to me to me that there is room, and indeed a need, for a coordinated approach from all stakeholders.
  • My pitch mentioned such things as the ‘T-shaped’ graduate and ePortfolios as an example of how, and why, librarians need to network, and join the conversation in associated arenas, with associated stakeholders, in order to demonstrate viability and secure their future.
  • Librarian Get LoudGet Involved…if you are involved Get More Involved!
  • If you get a chance to look through the feed from the #eportfoliohub16, and you’ll perhaps be struck, as I was, regarding the similarity of ideas, concerns, and motivations with some of those at #lilac16.
  • Librarians need not only to get LOUD, but, in these days of adaptability/innovation, should be leaders in reaching out to other interested parties regarding these issues.
  • Ok, let’s think big here…Imagine what could be achieved through a coordinated workshop, moving to a full-on conference and road-map/agreed or imagined approach?
  • Library/information professionals are under pressure to make their positions relevant, imagine if librarians could become involved in something like the research/composition of Eportfolios for example?
  • Using all your research/teaching expertise, giving you access to another department within an organisation, opening the door to administrative, training, HR and academic departments, and the students/colleagues therein?
  • Also, it would further diversify your role…. Having worked in a commercial environment myself, I really believe that to innovate, and diversify is crucial to survival, and a means to show the value of the service been given. Synergy is a given in business.
  • Are the LAI or associated institutions represented/present at conferences such as Career Guidance, NALA, various Professions or Teacher’s conferences?
  • Do these important and influential bodies know how progressive librarians are?
  • Have any of their reps been invited to CDG initiatives, Librarians ALOUD, LILAC 2016? Not necessarily to present, just to attend….
  • Do they know what you are doing, what you can offer, what wonderful allies you can be?
  • It seems to me that if you join forces on matters such as IL/ePortfolios for example, you may forge other areas where literacy, career, research and academic initiatives can be work-shopped, and a uniform approach, with librarians very much involved, could be agreed upon, and acted upon, keeping libraries/librarians at the core of whatever is happening in education/training

Carolanne

#eportfoliohub16

‘An e-portfolio is a purposeful aggregating of digital items – ideas, evidence, reflections, feedback etc., which ‘presents’ a selected audience with evidence of a person’s learning and/or ability.‘(Sutherland and Powell, 2007).

  • Paper-based portfolios have been used in education for many years.
  • In recent times the electronic portfolio or eportfolio has emerged as a preferred option, allowing portfolio owners to take advantage of digital technologies, often supported by specific eportfolio software.
    [Incidentally, for any of you not involved in academic libraries, could this service be used in career/training initiatives within your organisation?]
  • This three day workshop event, which takes place in DIT Aungier Street, will explore themes such as ePortfolio projects, tools and platforms, assessment and reflection, and digital identity and career progression.
  • DIT, ITB, ITT and Hibernia College, along with the support of the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, are delighted to host a National Irish ePortfolio Workshop event ‘ePortfolios in Ireland: What Now, Where Next?’ on 21st – 23rd March, 2016.
  • Some of the presenters came from DIT, IADT, RCSI, Teaching Institutes of education, LIT, TCD…
  • LILAC16same dates! – Was there a library/information specialist at DIT conference – not necessarily presenting, just attending, what did they think?
  • ‘LILAC is a fantastic opportunity to meet like- minded professionals and develop your information literacy practices. However, LILAC is not just about the programme, there are plenty of opportunities for meeting old and new friends, networking…’ What associated professions, other than library/information specialists, were attending at LILAC? What did they think?Libcamp5Fri, May 20, 2016 – Irish TimesWhy we need more T-shaped graduates’

Opinion: Young workers who combine knowledge with an ability to collaborate across different disciplines are in high demand

  • Concerns are growing that education systems are failing to equip students with the knowledge and attributes they need to flourish in the workplace.
  • Following extensive consultation with employers nationally and internationally, we identified six key attributes (including communications, leadership, problem-solving, innovative mind-sets, global awareness), underpinned by specific proficiencies (such as digital literacy), that are fostered in all our students.
  • [DCU] From this year, all incoming students will be provided with an e-portfolio that will act as a digital archive of personal development and will be framed around the headings of the six generic attributes. What’s happening in your institution?
  • But, how do we get associated groups/stakeholders to engage/enable/support our initiatives?…Networking
  • Following Twitter, it appears that the same people/interested groups are talking, and interacting with each other, which is fab, but is it time that other associated groups, from outside the library sphere also joined your conversation…or are reminded to include you in theirs?
  • #Futurelibrary Vs. #wordcon (writers/literary conference) same day…being held in the NLI!) … ASTI conference also happening!
  • Was there a library/information specialist at these conferences? What did they think?
  • Was there a writer/literary festival volunteer or expert/teacher at #Futurelibrary? What did they think?

So, do you know —a relative, friend, neighbour, someone in your sports club, drama club, PTA, a committee you are on, stitch ‘n bitch group?! Who is a:

  • Teacher – Educate Together/ Early school leavers/ DEIS
  • Lecturer in yours, or another, institute of education
  • Career Guidance [use library story if time]
  • Someone involved in a committee in their particular profession
  • NALA volunteer/co-ordinator
  • Someone in Science
  • Medical field
  • Recruitment
  • Marketing/Communications
  • Colleague or lunch buddy involved in a different Dept/area within your organisation
  • Associated NGO – e.g. Fighting words, JobCare, SUI, [across whole demographic]
  • Grad Ireland
  • Organisers of a course/CPD you undertook, e.g. 12 Apps…
  • These are all people who have the potential to engage with libraries and recognise what libraries can offer in terms of education/skills/training :
  • As importantly/conversely they have a professional or social skills/connections and/or the professional/philanthropic/altruistic outlook to offer advice/feed-back and support to library initiatives…
  • But How?!! Engagement with associated professional fields, or advocacy groups. Show & Tell!
  • Ask! – I was delighted to be invited here today. People like to help! Or Tell! – leave the door open…

How:

  • Virtual: Know what’s going on in their world
  • Good Examples:
    • Books Upstairs (@BooksUpstairs) tweeted at 0:14 PM on Thu, May 19, 2016:
      “Bringing the mind-set of performance theatre production to literary events” @sarahkeegs @WordsIreland #wordcon
    • @gutterbookshop – masters of the network: but not crass & staying true to their community….involved in ILF Dublin & Dalkey Book Festival
  • Virtual: Let them know what is going on in your world that may be of interest in their world
  • Virtual ‘invitees’ to conferences – let them know about your # – offer to mail your follow-up slides that may be useful…encourage them to RT…
  • Real: Invite them to your workshops, think-ins, dare I say it, conferences: go to theirs!
  • Two for one entry? Bring a friend initiative?
  • Engage first…involve them…it may lead to a reciprocal arrangement…
  • And then, slowly, but surely, build on those relationships, expand what you’ve done in library/library school circles to neighbouring organisations!

Why?

  • You owe it to yourselves, and to future librarians/information specialists.
  • You have to show that your teaching initiatives, indeed, your library, or your role within an organisation has merit, and consequently receives the funding and recognition it deserves…it is within your power.
  • Otherwise, you are going to be dealing with ‘the Horse has bolted’ situation: initiatives such as # my library my right are worthy and correct, but, in my opinion, the damage is done, the horse has bolted, someone has closed the stable door…
  • Start the conversation, engage, show your knowledge, and show how you can help: take advice, observe what is going on in associated spheres. Learn as well as teach.
  • However, constant CPD/Certification/upskilling is not the only answer, [maybe sponsor a workshop for CPD on networking?]…
  • co-operate, and stay connected, that way, people are dealing with people, and not competing organisations/entities: competing for recognition and funding:
  • Show that Libraries are friendly allies, not the conquering or vanquished enemy: not a Trojan horse!

Feed-back: Comments from attendees to pitch:

  • [agree…librarians] ‘need to be less self-effacing’
  • [librarians] ‘are too humble’
  • [need to] ‘get out there…[show] their skills’
  • [demonstrate] ‘their added value’
  • [concern] ‘Use CPD for myself…attend conferences for me….’ [in response suggested that this could still be the case, but, perhaps also invite people to follow the twitter feed/# for the event]
  • [comment] ‘cross-pollination of ideas a good thing’
  • [Reaching out to others] ‘not just for events’…[Rudaí 23 had an educator involved [who] ‘added dimension’

Written by Carolanne McPartlan

Join us online for a Twitter chat on evidence-based librarianship on Thursday 30th June at 11am (BST)

We’re very excited to be collaborating  with our friends and colleagues in Australia: LARK Library Applied Research Kollektive to bring you a Twitter chat discussing a fantastic article on evidence-based librarianship by Denise Pan (Associate Dean for Collections and Content at University of Washington) and Zaana Howard (strategic designer and human-centred design coach). The article we’ve chosen describes a range of innovative research methods which can help to transform libraries into evidence-based communities of practice (scroll down for more info!)

#EBLIPRG

The Twitter group #EBLIPRG (Evidence-based Library and Information Practice Reading Group) began in August 2015, led by Suzana Sukovic, Fiona MacDonald and Liz Walkley Hall. They were inspired by the conversations that they’d had at the EBLIP8 Conference, and wanted to find a way to continue their discussions. And so their Twitter reading group began – a first for the Australian library community! (For the full back story, see here).


Check out #EBLIPRG on Twitter for a quick idea of what it’s all about.

If you’re new to Twitter chats you can find out how to  participate here, but the short story is it’s a great way to connect with other library professionals, researchers, students within your own network and around the World – anyone who’s on Twitter can have their say!


How to join:

  1. Read the article we’ve chosen to discuss (link to full-text, details, and abstract below!)

  2. Have a quick look at the discussion questions we’ve come up with

  3. Get online at 11am on Thursday 30th June and lurk, listen, join in!

  4. Make sure to use #EBLIPRG in your Tweets!

 


ARTICLE:
Pan, Denise & Howard, Zaana (2010) Distributing leadership and cultivating dialogue with collaborative EBIP. Library Management, 31(7), pp. 494-504.


Teaser1

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


1. Do you think the experience and knowledge of library staff is utilised by library management to make decisions?
2. The article describes a reorganisation of library staff and workflows to flatten the hierarchical structure & better reflect library priorities. Have you ever worked somewhere with a shared leadership culture?
How was it achieved?
3. What obstacles prevent a shared leadership culture from thriving?
4. What are the advantages/disadvantages of a distributed leadership model? (see pros and cons on p.7)
5. Have you or your organisation ever used an appreciative inquiry model to research your workplace, and if so, what were the results?
6. Where have you found a community of practice for librarians? (Associations, organisations, committees, groups, workplaces, ex-colleagues, etc.)
7. Think of three initiatives that could help convert your workplace into a knowledge creating community
8. The article acknowledges library personnel as assets by recognising that when libraries maximise the talents & skills of a diverse staff the organisation becomes responsive & innovative. Discuss.

Teaser2You can read more on the LARK blog or like their FB page to keep up with international trends in library research…

See you next Thursday!

LibCamp 2016 Programme is complete!

12 great pitches complete the programme for the afternoon with 4 happening at once!

Our amazing programme of pitches for #irelibcamp16 is now full and we are delighted with the variety and quality of the pitchers (see below)! We’ll continue to sell tickets until we’re sold out but  make sure to book your place soon to hear from all these great librarians and library advocates on how libraries can and do interact with teaching and learning in different settings!

LibCamp 2016 Programme

10 excellent reasons to drop what you’re doing and come to Library Camp

If you haven’t made up your mind yet whether to attend LibraryCamp this Saturday, read on for ten very good reasons why you should book your ticket and tell your friends to book theirs too. Apart from our crazy-bananas-good programme of pitchers talking about everything from social inclusion, tips and tools for teaching and how librarians can embrace their teaching role and gain professional recognition there’s a multitude of other good reasons to come…

#1. The venue!

#irelibcamp16 is taking place in The Student Common Room in Dublin Business School (on the 4th floor of Castle House building) on George Street. This central location is easy to get to and the Room is fitted out with with a grass floor, bean bags, sofas, various games (Jenga! darts!) and last but not least a big iPad type jukebox (5 songs for €1!)

Pitch - Katie Dickson#2. Find out how school librarians are coping with the challenges of classroom management and pedagogy in the library, as well as getting professional recognition

 

#3. A library-themed Quizz

Eh…who doesn’t love a good pub-quizz? this one will be a fun version based around the theme of libraries!

nerd

Pitch - Jack Hyland (1)#4. Try out a student-centred teaching tool called Peerwise that Jack Hyland is using in his classes with 3rd level students


Prosecco and cake#5. Cake and prosecco…need we say more?


 

 

#6. Hear about why Academic libraries are still a vital part of the infrastructure and support for teaching and learning in Higher Education in the age of Google with Siobhán Dunne

Pitch - Siobhan Dunne

#7. Discuss continuing professional development and pedagogy for librarians with Robert McKenna

Pitch - Rob McKenna

#8. Have your say on how libraries can fill gaps in the education system for those with special needs with Elaine Chapman

Pitch - Elaine Chapman

#9. Hear about teaching in Corporate and Legal libraries!Pitch - Niamh

 

Pitch - Gen#10. Catch up on what you missed or discuss what you learned at LILAC 2016 in UCD!

 

 

 

 

#11. Socialising/meeting peers/networking…the pub afterwards!

We will be following the day’s learning with a few drinks in a local bar on Georges St. (location TBA) where you can mix and mingle with the group.


Ok so that’s more than 10 – plus there’s more!

We still have a few excellent pitches up our sleeve – stay tuned to find out which brilliant librarians from public, academic and special libraries will be giving their take on the teaching role of libraries and librarians on the 21st May! Check out the pitches as they role in on our Pitches page and then head straight over to Eventbrite to book your tickets.

#irelibcamp16 FTW!

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Booking Live for #irelibcamp16

Booking has gone live! get your ticket for Lib Camp 2016 through Eventbrite

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We’ve worked hard at trying to make it as interesting as possible – we have some great pitches lined up (see them on the Pitches page!) as well as some fun activities (think quizzes! cake-eating! prosecco!) in the fantastic Dublin Business School. You’ll get to network with other librarians and students and if you decide to pitch get some great experience public speaking. If pitching isn’t for you come along on the day and join in the discussions!

As always you can tweet your thoughts throughout the day #irelibcamp16

Get your ticket now to avoid disappointment!

 

 

Call for Pitches

Call-for-pithces-LibCampAre all librarians teachers?

As you might have heard, Library Camp is back on the 21st May in Dublin Business School with a fun mix-up of discussions, pitches, and a library quiz! Are you new to speaking openly about your love of all things library-related and looking for a relaxed environment in which to cut your public-speaking teeth? Or perhaps you’ve been teaching for years in your library and are exasperated by the lack of recognition? Maybe you see new avenues and collaborations for librarians to exploit or have seen or heard of interesting new ways of engaging people in learning? Maybe you want to talk about how librarians can tackle a lack of formal teacher-training and still meet/exceed expectations? Maybe you just want to meet others in your field and eat cake? Now’s your chance! You have until the 16th May to be accepted but the slots are filling up so don’t miss out on this fun and valuable professional development opportunity!

You’ll have up to 25 mins, a flip-chart and some markers to lead a discussion or play a game or talk about how the worlds of teaching and librarianship combine. Maybe co-host a pitch if you’re feeling a bit lonely!

Submit a pitch (a paragraph or two) outlining your topic to laicareerdevelopment@gmail.com and we’ll get back to you within a few days – your pitch will be added to our Pitches for 2016 page shortly after. Want examples? See our What to Pitch and How Library Camp works pages.